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2017 Ph.D. Defenses

Nov

27

2017

PhD Candidate Kathryn A. Sontag - "Computational Study of Upstream-Propagating Potential Disturbances In an Axial Flow Compressor"

WHERE: 103 Multidisciplinary Research Building
FROM: 1:00PM TO 3:30PM

One of the most common causes of aircraft engine failure is the high cycle fatigue of rotor and stator blades. High cycle fatigue is often the result of neighboring blade row interactions that cause an aerodynamic excitation to be resonant with a mechanical natural frequency.

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Nov

16

2017

PhD Candidate Ryan C. McGowan - "The Pulsed-DC Plasma Actuator: Characteristics and Stall Control In Axial Compressors and Fans"

WHERE: 103 Multidisciplinary Research Building
FROM: 1:00PM TO 4:30PM

A new means of powering dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators that utilizes a pulsed-DC waveform is proposed for preventing or delaying stall inception in axial compressors and fans. The plasma actuator arrangement, like most AC DBD designs, has two staggered electrodes that are separated by an insulating dielectric layer. However, instead of an AC voltage input to drive the actuator, the pulsed-DC DBD utilizes a DC voltage source.

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Jun

28

2017

PhD Candidate Neerajha Nagarjan - "Biomechanical Investigation of Engineered Muscle Tissue Constructs for Disease Modeling and Biorobotics"

WHERE: B029 Hessert Laboratory
FROM: 9:30AM TO 11:30AM

Contractility of heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes (CM), is the major parameter for determining their maturity and functionality. Consequently, investigating the effect of mechanical microenvironment on CM function is vital for understanding the underlying mechanism of their behavior in healthy as well as in diseased state. In this work, we investigated contractile biomechanical properties of cardiomyocytes using two different approaches, for biomedical applications ranging from biorobotics to heart disease studies

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Jun

20

2017

PhD Candidate Mohammed S. Kamel - "Aero-Optical Predictions of High-Reynolnds Number Flows Using Wall-Modeled Large-Eddy Simulation"

WHERE: 103 Multidisciplinary Research Building
FROM: 2:00PM TO 4:30PM

Reliable prediction of optical wavefront distortions induced by compressible turbulent flow surrounding an aperture is crucial to the development of airborne laser systems. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with a wall model provides a promising high-fidelity simulation method for high-Reynolds-number aero-optical flows by avoiding the severe near-wall resolution requirement. In this study, wall-modeled LES is employed to predict and analyze aero-optical distortions of subsonic and supersonic turbulent boundary layers, and subsonic and transonic flows over cylindrical turrets at high Reynolds numbers.

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May

17

2017

PhD Candidate Brian F. Hilbert - "The Design, Validation, and Application of an Inverse Heat Transfer Measurement Technique"

WHERE: 103 Multidisciplinary Research Building
FROM: 2:00PM TO 4:30PM

A heat transfer measurement technique based on the solution of an inverse conduction problem has been developed, validated, and applied in transonic turbine casings with variable surface roughness. A major advantage of the method is that it can be implemented for irregular surface geometries, as opposed to contact sensors which are generally not applicable in these types of situations.

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