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Adam Czajka

Adam Czajka

Research Assistant Professor

Department of Computer Science and Engineering

Research Assistant Professor
College of Engineering


Phone: 574-631-7072

Office: 321B Stinson-Remick Hall


Ph.D., Warsaw University of Technology, 2005

M.Sc., Warsaw University of Technology, 1995


Adam Czajka is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering in the College of Engineering here at the University of Notre Dame. He received his M.Sc. in Computer Control Systems and his Ph.D. in Biometrics from Warsaw University of Technology (WUT), Poland (both with honors). He is also an Assistant Professor with the Research and Academic Computer Network – national research institute (NASK), Poland. His scientific interests include biometrics and security, computer vision, and machine learning. Before coming to Notre Dame, Professor Czajka was the Chair of the Biometrics and Machine Learning Laboratory at the Institute of Control and Computation Engineering at WUT, the Head of the Postgraduate Studies on Security and Biometrics, the Vice Chair of the NASK Biometrics Laboratory, and a member of the NASK Research Council. He is a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE), the Chair of the Polish Standardization Committee on Biometrics, and an active member of the European Association for Biometrics.

Summary of Activities/Interests


Biometrics (CSE 40537/60537), Spring 2018 (course webpage), Spring 2017 (course webpage) and Fall 2014 (course webpage)
Computer Vision (CSE 40535/60535), Fall 2017 (course webpage) and Spring 2016 (course webpage)
Neural Networks (CSE 40868/60868), Fall 2016 (course webpage)

Scientific interests:

Biometrics and security, computer vision, machine learning.


Adam Czajka Asks: Is That Eyeball Dead or Alive?

July 25, 2016

Adam Czajka discusses the prevention of iris sensors accepting the use of a high-resolution photo of an iris or, in a grislier scenario, an actual eyeball.