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Alan C. Seabaugh

Alan Seabaugh

Contact Info

Email: aseabaug@nd.edu
Phone: 574-631-4473
Office: 230A Cushing Hall
Website: http://www.nd.edu/~nano

Summary of Activities/Interests

Research Interests: Research in the Seabaugh group addresses questions of limits in electron devices and circuits. What limits device energy-efficiency, density, speed, power dissipation, ...? Are there better materials, devices, or circuit tricks to improve performance? Are there new effects we can use at the limits of miniaturization? Current research areas include tunnel field-effect transistors, memory, transport in two-dimensional materials, and lithium ion batteries.

Courses: Analog Integrated Circuits Design, Electrical Energy Extraction, Electromagnetic Fields and Waves, Electronics, Semiconductors

Education

Ph.D.E.E. University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1985

Biography

Alan Seabaugh is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, Director of the SRC-NRI Midwest Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery (MIND) and Associate Director of the Notre Dame Center for Nano Science and Technology. He received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, in 1985. Before joining the faculty at Notre Dame he held research positions at the National Bureau of Standards (1979 to 1986), Texas Instruments (1986 to 1997), and Raytheon (1997 to 1999). He has authored or coauthored more than 300 papers and over 90 invited presentations at conferences and workshops; he has 22 U.S. patents and 10 foreign patents and is an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices. He received teaching awards in 1990 from U.T. Dallas and 2001 from Notre Dame. He was elected Senior Fellow at Raytheon in 1999 and IEEE Fellow in 2003. He received the Int. Symp. on Comp. Semicon. Quantum Devices Award in 2011 for seminal contributions and leadership in semiconductor devices and circuits based on quantum mechanical tunneling.