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Prashant Kamat

Prashant V Kamat

Email: pkamat@nd.edu

Phone: 574-631-5411

Office: 206/235 Radiation Lab

Education

B.S. Karnatak University, India (1972)

M.S. Bombay University, India (1974)

Ph.D. Bombay University, India (1979)

Biography

Publications

Kamat, P. V.; Tvrdy, K.; Baker, D. R.; Radich, J. G. Beyond Photovoltaics: Semiconductor Nanoarchitectures for Liquid Junction Solar Cells. Chem. Rev. 2010, 110, 6664–6688.

Kamat, P. V. Boosting the Efficiency of Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells Through Modulation of Interfacial Charge Transfer. . Acc. Chem. Res. 2012, 45, 1906–1915.

Kamat, P. V. Manipulation of Charge Transfer Across Semiconductor Interface. A Criterion that Cannot be Ignored in Photocatalyst Design. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2012, 3, 663-672.

Lightcap, I. V.; Kamat, P. V. Fortification of CdSe Quantum Dots with Graphene Oxide. Excited State Interactions and Light Energy Conversion. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 7109–7116.

Choi, H.; Santra, P. K.; Kamat, P. V. Synchronized Energy and Electron Transfer Processes in Covalently Linked CdSe-Squaraine Dye-TiO2 Light Harvesting Assembly. ACS Nano 2012, 6, 5718–5726.

Genovese, M. P.; Lightcap, I. V.; Kamat, P. V. Sun-Believable Solar Paint. A Transformative One-Step Approach for Designing Nanocrystalline Solar Cells. ACS Nano 2012, 6, 865–872.

Lightcap, I. V.; Murphy, S.; Schumer, T.; Kamat, P. V. Electron Hopping Through Single-to-Few Layer Graphene Oxide Films. Photocatalytically Activated  Metal Nanoparticle Deposition. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2012, 3, 1453-1458.

Radich, J. G.; Kamat, P. V. Origin of Reduced Graphene Oxide Enhancements in Electrochemical Energy Storage. ACS Catalysis 2012, 2, 807-816.

Summary of Activities/Interests

Our research efforts in recent years have focused on the topics related to semiconductor & metal nanoclusters, photoresponsive organic-inorganic hybrid nanoassemblies, solar cells and surface photochemistry and radiation chemistry. The main emphasis of our research is to elucidate the mechanistic and kinetic details of charge transfer processes in heterogeneous assemblies with an objective to improve energy conversion efficencies. Our recent work in the area of chromophore functionalized metal nanoparticles and improved catalytic activity of semiconductor-metal-graphene composites is a significant contribution towards the development of novel heterogeneous systems for light energy conversion.

Advanced Nano Materials: Metal and semiconductor nanostructures, Molecular Clusters & Carbon nanostructures (Carbon nanotubes and fullerenes)

- Synthesis, characterization, and surface functionalization, Optical properties, Photoelectrochemistry, and Sensor applications.

Solar Energy Conversion: Quantum Dot Solar Cells, Design of inorganic-organic nanoassemblies for light energy conversion,

- Surface photochemical processes, molecular clusters, ultrafast photophysical and photochemical events at mesoscale, mechanism and kinetics of photoeffects at semiconductor/electrolyte interface.

Solar fuels: Semiconductor metal composites for photocatalytic hydrogen production, electrochemical and photoelectrochemical reduction of CO2

- Understanding the role of cocatalysts, plasmonic effects, electrocatalysis

News

Thomson Reuters Names Three Notre Dame Faculty Among the World's Most Influential Scientific Minds

July 2, 2014

Joan Brennecke, Bertrand Hochwald, and Prashant Kamat have been named to Thomson Reuters’ list of The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds: 2014. The list includes more than 3,200 scientists around the world who have published the highest number of articles that are cited the most frequently by other researchers. The list was compiled from two separate Thomson Reuters studies analyzed for publication and citation data from 21 broad fields of study, ranging from chemistry to social sciences.

Tapping Solar Power with Perovskites

February 25, 2014

The cover story from the most recent issue of Chemical & Engineering News by Mitch Jacoby features research being conducted at Notre Dame and other universities around the country highlighting a new solar-cell technology. Featured work includes the research being conducted at Notre Dame by faculty and students, including Prashant Kamat and Joseph Manser.

Researchers Identify a Low-cost Alternative Material for Next-generation Solar Cells

January 24, 2014

With the continual increase in demand for global energy, scientists across the world are working to find a way to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources that are more efficient and environmentally friendly. The sun delivers more energy to the Earth’s surface in one hour than the entire world uses in one year, and realizing the full potential of solar power will require finding effective, inexpensive ways to utilize this vast energy source. Researchers have identified a possible inorganic material for perovskite solar cells, which provides a lower-cost alternative to the organic polymers currently used in the cells.

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