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Paul McGinn

Paul McGinn

Email: pmcginn@nd.edu

Phone: 574-631-6151

Office: 178 Fitzpatrick Hall

Education

Ph.D, University of Notre Dame, 1984

M.S., Metallurgical Engr. & Materials Science, University of Notre Dame, 1983

B.S., Metallurgical Engr. & Materials Science, University of Notre Dame, 1980

Biography

Staff Engineer, IBM Corp., East Fishkill, NY (1984-1987)
Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame (1987-1990)
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame (1990-1992)
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame (1992-1994)
Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of Notre Dame (1994-1997)
Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of Notre Dame (1997-present)

Recent Publications

Ying Jin, Paul J. McGinn, “Li7La3Zr2O12 electrolyte stability in air and fabrication of a Li/ Li7La3Zr2O12/Cu0.1V2O5 solid-state battery” Journal of Power Sources, 239 (2013) 326-331 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpowsour.2013.03.155 

Changsheng Su, Paul J. McGinn, “Application of Glass Soot Catalysts on Metal Supports to Achieve Low Soot Oxidation Temperature”, Catalysis Communications, 43 (2014) 1-5 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.catcom.2013.08.013

James Zokoe, Paul J. McGinn, “Catalytic diesel soot oxidation by hydrothermally stable glass catalysts” Chemical Engineering Journal, 262 (2015) 68-77 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cej.2014.09.075

John G. Hauck and Paul J. McGinn, “Screening of Novel Li-Air Battery Catalyst Materials by a Thin Film Combinatorial Materials Approach,” ACS Combinatorial Science, 17(6) 355-364 (2015) http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acscombsci.5b00030

Paul McGinn, “Combinatorial Electrochemistry - Processing and Characterization for Materials Discovery” Materials Discovery, in press, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.md.2015.10.002

Summary of Activities/Interests

Professor McGinn's primary research interests are in the areas of the processing and properties of advanced materials. Current research programs are aimed at developing the processing tools and screening instrumentation for combinatorial materials development and discovery. The combinatorial approach to materials research employs parallel (or automated serial) processing to create large "libraries" of material compositions, followed by parallel (or automated serial) testing to characterize the compositions for a specific property of interest. Much of the potential of the combinatorial approach rests on the development of rapid means to screen libraries for a property of interest. Over the past several years his group has developed and put in place a wide range of automated processing and characterization tools for combinatorial research. These are being applied to develop new fuel cell electrocatalysts, proton conductors, battery electrode materials, among other materials