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2019 Naughton Fellowship awardees announced

Nina Welding • DATE: June 19, 2019

2019 Naughton Fellowship awardees announced

Kylmore Abbey in Connemara, County Galway, Ireland. Photo by Barbara Johnston/University of Notre Dame

Twenty-one students have been announced as awardees of the Naughton Fellowships for 2019. The research fellowships were awarded to undergraduate and master's students from the University of Notre Dame and from five universities in Ireland. This year’s winners from Notre Dame represent three colleges and schools.

Speaking about this year’s awardees, Brian Baker, the Rev. John A. Zahm Professor of Structural Biology and director of the Naughton Fellowships, said, “The Naughton Fellowships’ candidate pool gets stronger every year and I am thrilled to note that this year was no different. Our diverse students represent the best and brightest from across Ireland and the University of Notre Dame. I look forward to witnessing their ongoing and forthcoming research achievements.”

The 2019 Naughton Fellowship awardees are as follows:

Master’s

Evan Cannon, who has a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering from the National University of Ireland, Galway, will complete the Engineering, Science and Technology Entrepreneurship Excellence Masters (ESTEEM) program at the University of Notre Dame.

Niamh Collins, who has a bachelor’s degree in electrical and electronic engineering from the University College Cork, will complete the ESTEEM program at Notre Dame.

Mark Etzelmueller, an electrical engineering graduate from Notre Dame, will study in the bioengineering program at Trinity College Dublin.

Sam Gray, who has a doctoral degree in medicine and a master’s degree of neuroscience from Trinity College Dublin, will complete the ESTEEM program at Notre Dame.

Ellen Joyce, who has a bachelor’s degree in management and information system studies from Trinity College Dublin, will complete the ESTEEM program at Notre Dame.

Henry Perillo, a recent graduate of biological sciences at Notre Dame, will undertake a master's in environmental sciences at Trinity College Dublin.

Undergraduate
Joseph Carthy, an engineering student at University College Dublin, will complete research on energy recovery for low-level computation at the University of Notre Dame.

Patrick Cremin, an electrical engineering major at Notre Dame, will complete research on biomedical optics and optical engineering at University College Dublin.

Claudine Duggan, a biology student at University College Dublin, will undertake research in biology at Notre Dame.

Jack Enright, a physics student at University College Cork, will complete experimental nuclear physics research at Notre Dame.

William Hearne, a chemical and biomolecular engineering major at Notre Dame, will study ammonia synthesis routes for his research at Trinity College Dublin.

Muireann Hoare, an engineering major at University College Cork, will undertake research on nanoelectronic devices and circuits at Notre Dame.

Thomas Kacius, a biochemistry student at Notre Dame, will complete a research project called “Asymmetric synthesis of pharmaceutically important – lactones” at Dublin City University.

Dawn Kelly, an engineering student at Trinity College Dublin, will complete research on a project called “Chemical sensor for fluid dynamic and environmental applications” at the University of Notre Dame.

Conor Lawlor, a biology student at Dublin City University, will undertake research in biology at Notre Dame.

Cian Levy, an engineering major at Trinity College Dublin, will undertake research on a project titled “Profiling of homomorphic encryption in secure data mining” at Notre Dame.

Emily McGill, a physics student at Dublin City University, will complete physics research at Notre Dame.

Madeline Owen, a neuroscience and behavior major with a poverty studies minor and a Glynn Family Honors program minor at the University of Notre Dame, will complete a research project titled “Characterizing the role of bone marrow stem cells” at Trinity College Dublin.

Vy Ngugen Sanders, a science preprofessional student at Notre Dame, will undertake a research project on microbiology and immunology at Trinity College Dublin.

Zoe Tulauskus, a biochemistry major at Notre Dame, will undertake a research project called “The role of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) and their potential as vaccine candidates” at University College Dublin.

Abigale Wood, a science preprofessional and psychology student at the University of Notre Dame, will undertake research on “A new method for the synthesis of prostaglandin analogue” at Dublin City University.

Additionally, one Clark Fellowship was awarded to Luke Tholen, an electrical engineering student at the University of Notre Dame, who will research uranyl complexes at Trinity College Dublin.

Founded in 2008 with an $8 million gift from the Naughton family, the Naughton Fellowship program facilitates broad cross-cultural training for exceptional students with leadership potential in select fields, stimulates collaborative research among the engineers and scientists who train these students, and forges deeper and stronger ties between Ireland and the United States.

“It is thanks to the vision and support of the Naughton family that these students will have the opportunity to grow and expand their scholarship abroad. We are grateful for their continued support of this life-changing program,” Baker said.

The Naughton Fellowship program allows students with a background in or aptitude for STEM fields to experience international research and educational opportunities through a funded exchange program involving the University of Notre Dame and some of Ireland’s leading research universities. Irish undergraduates, master's students and doctoral candidates can come to Notre Dame on the fellowship, while Notre Dame undergraduates, master's students and doctoral candidates can travel to Ireland to study and complete research.

For more information, including how to apply, visit naughton.nd.edu.

— Joanne Fahey, ND Research