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Matthew Webber

Matthew J Webber

Email: mwebber@nd.edu

Phone: 574-631-4246

Office: 205B McCourtney Hall

Education

Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, 2011

M.S Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University 2009

B.S. Chemical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 2006

Summary of Activities/Interests

Research interests:

• Supramolecular Biomaterials: The use of non-covalent molecular recognition motifs to engineer highly tunable, dynamic, modular, and bioactive materials for biomedical and biological applications (see Webber et al. Nature Materials 2016)

• “Smart” Drug Delivery and Diagnostics: The development of new strategies to deliver drugs, therapeutic proteins, or diagnostic agents that are capable of sensing and responding to spatiotemporal indicators of disease and/or overcoming physiologic barriers imposed by complexities of disease pathology (see Webber & Langer Chem Soc Rev 2017)

• Bio-inspired Materials: The engineering of new materials using nature as inspiration, or alternatively, using natural frameworks in order to engineer materials with emergent properties that realize enhanced functionality and improved environmental sensing

• Supramolecular Chemistry: The development of new supramolecular motifs that afford enhanced affinity, improved biocompatibility, and/or more precise biomimicry to fully integrate the practice of supramolecular chemistry into new strategies for healthcare

 

Selected Publications:

  1. J.K. Sahoo,*, M.A. VandenBerg,*, M.J. Webber. “Injectable Network Biomaterials via Molecular or Colloidal Self-Assembly Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews 127:185-207; 2018
  2. M.J. Webber, R. Langer. “Drug Delivery by Supramolecular Design” Chemical Society Reviews 46(21):6600-6620; 2017
  3. M.J. Webber “Engineering Responsive Supramolecular Biomaterials: Toward Smart Therapeutics” Bioengineering and Translational Medicine (an AIChE Journal) 1(3):252-266; 2016
  4. M.J. Webber*, E.A. Appel*, B. Vinciguerra, A.B. Cortinas, L.S. Thapa, S. Jhunjhunwala, L. Isaacs, R. Langer, D.G. Anderson. “Supramolecular PEGylation of Biopharmaceuticals” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113(50):14189-14194; 2016
  5. M.J. Webber*, E.A. Appel*, E.W. Meijer, R. Langer. “Supramolecular Biomaterials.” Nature Materials 15(1):13-26; 2016

News

Students receive fellowships to address diabetes, cancer, and maternal mortality

July 19, 2019

Three students from the University of Notre Dame have received fellowships through the Advanced Diagnostics & Therapeutics’ Berry Family Foundation Graduate Fellowship Program. Since 2013, the program has sponsored young researchers during a key part of their education and acted as a springboard for future career opportunities in academic and corporate research.

Students receive fellowships to address diabetes, cancer, and maternal mortality

July 19, 2019

Three students from the University of Notre Dame have received fellowships through the Advanced Diagnostics & Therapeutics’ Berry Family Foundation Graduate Fellowship Program. Since 2013, the program has sponsored young researchers during a key part of their education and acted as a springboard for future career opportunities in academic and corporate research.

Researchers develop drug-targeting molecules to improve cancer treatment

June 12, 2019

Researchers from the University of Notre Dame have developed small drug-targeting molecules that may be hundreds to thousands of times more effective at delivering potent drugs to desired sites of disease, including cancer.

Researchers develop drug-targeting molecules to improve cancer treatment

June 12, 2019

Researchers from the University of Notre Dame have developed small drug-targeting molecules that may be hundreds to thousands of times more effective at delivering potent drugs to desired sites of disease, including cancer.

Researchers develop drug-targeting molecules to improve cancer treatment

June 12, 2019

Researchers from the University of Notre Dame have developed small drug-targeting molecules that may be hundreds to thousands of times more effective at delivering potent drugs to desired sites of disease, including cancer.