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Tim Weninger

Tim Weninger

Email: tweninge@nd.edu

Phone: 574-631-6770

Office: 353 Fitzpatrick Hall

Education

Ph.D., Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013

Biography

I work in "network science," with a particular focus on multimodal/heterogeneous information networks. My research lies at the intersection of machine learning and databases and information retrieval.

Summary of Activities/Interests

Network science, data science, machine learning, databases, and information retrieval.

News

In Trump v. Twitter: ‘Twitter will win’

June 8, 2020

As America’s general election looms, Tim Weninger, the Frank M. Friemann Collegiate Associate Professor of Engineering in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, discusses the current state of social media, the dangers of disinformation and how users can get smarter about what they share.

In Trump v. Twitter: ‘Twitter will win’

June 8, 2020

As America’s general election looms, Tim Weninger, the Frank M. Friemann Collegiate Associate Professor of Engineering in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, discusses the current state of social media, the dangers of disinformation and how users can get smarter about what they share.

Researchers develop early warning system to fight disinformation online

March 24, 2020

Two computer science and engineering faculty members and a doctoral student in peace studies are using artificial intelligence to develop an early warning system that will identify manipulated images, deepfake videos and disinformation online.

Researchers develop early warning system to fight disinformation online

March 24, 2020

Two computer science and engineering faculty members and a doctoral student in peace studies are using artificial intelligence to develop an early warning system that will identify manipulated images, deepfake videos and disinformation online.

A new AI early warning system to combat disinformation and prevent violence previewed in the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists

March 16, 2020

Participation in a panel discussion on the ethics of AI led to a collaboration between two computer science and engineering faculty members and a doctoral candidate in theology and peace studies about the possible intersections between seemingly diverse fields. They have now developed an AI early warning system to help combat disinformation and prevent violence.